Soul Searching: The Religious and Spiritual Lives of American Teenagers

By Christian Smith; Melinda Lundquist Denton | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This project and book would not have been possible without the generous support of Lilly Endowment Inc. Very many heartfelt thanks therefore go especially to Chris Coble and Craig Dykstra for their tremendous support and excellent advice for the National Study of Youth and Religion. Thanks, too, go to Mark Constantine for his early help in mobilizing this research project. Roxann Miller, Debby Pyatt, and Phil Schwadel have all made unique and important contributions to the NSYR, for which we are likewise grateful. Many thanks to staff at the UNC Odum Institute for Research in Social Science for their administrative and logistical support of the NSYR: Ken Bollen, Peter Leousis, and Beverly Wood. We are grateful for the important research contributions of the many graduate students and co-investigators involved in this project: John Bartkowski, Tim Cupery, Kenda Dean, Dan Dehanas, Korie Edwards, Richard Flory, John Hipp, Lindsay Hirschfeld, Younoki Lee, Lisa Pearce, Norm Peart, Darci Powell, Mark Regnerus, Demetrius Semien, David Sikkink, Sondra Smolek, Steve Vaisey, and Eve Veliz. For excellent interview transcription work, thanks to Viviana Calandra, Meredith Conder, Krista Goranson, Laura Hoseley, and Diane Johnson. The NSYR's Public Advisory Board served as a tremendously helpful resource in the development of this project; we are much obliged to Dan Aleshire, Leah Austin, Mary Jo Bane, Dorothy Bass, Brad Braxton, Carmen Cervantes, Gerald Durley, Ian Evison, Robert Franklin, Edwin Hernandez, Rick Lawrence, Sherry Magill, Roland Martinson, Bob McCarty, George Penick, Jonathan Sher, Bill Treanor, and Jonathan Woocher. Thanks to John Blunk and Kathy Holliday

-vii-

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