Soul Searching: The Religious and Spiritual Lives of American Teenagers

By Christian Smith; Melinda Lundquist Denton | Go to book overview
Save to active project

Conclusion

THE TITLE OF THIS BOOK is intended to suggest three meanings. First, in the research project this book reports on, we as sociologists were embarked on a kind of sociological search for the souls of American teenagers. We were not trying to save their souls, simply to do our best to reach and better understand them. Second, what we found when we did so is that many, though certainly not all, U.S. teenagers are themselves engaged in a kind of search for their own souls—trying to sort through their life and faith identity, beliefs, commitments, and practices in their long passages from childhood to adulthood. Teenagers, however, are not a people apart, an alien race about whom adults can only shake their heads and look forward to their growing up. Teenagers are part of us, fully members of our families, religious congregations, neighborhoods, communities, and nation. Teenagers and adults, it turns out, have much more in common with each other than not, and so need to learn better to care for each other. Communities of faith in particular often profess to care about the youth in their midst. Therefore, third, we hope that the findings of this book set various groups and communities of adults on their own processes of soul searching, for when it comes to American adult attitudes and practices regarding adolescents, we think a good deal of soul searching is warranted. To that end, we intend this book to be, among other things, a catalyst for many soul-searching conversations in various communities and organizations about the experience and place of adolescents in our society, in particular the significance of the religious and spiritual lives of teenagers today.

-259-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Soul Searching: The Religious and Spiritual Lives of American Teenagers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 346

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?