The American Revolution: A History in Documents

By Steven C. Bullock | Go to book overview
Contents
6WHAT IS A DOCUMENT
8HOW TO READ A DOCUMENT
11INTRODUCTION: Madness and the Revolution
17Chapter One THE FAMILY QUARREL: THE COMING OF THE REVOLUTION
19Growing Children
21Raising Money and Rising Anger
27We Are Therefore—SLAVES
29Violence in the Streets
34Tea in the Harbor
41Chapter Two BREAKING THE BONDS: WAR AND INDEPENDENCE
42The Road from Lexington and Concord
45Causes and Necessities
53Free and Independent
60Was Washington Good Enough?
64Little Successes—and Big Ones
71Chapter Three TAKING SIDES: THE EXPERIENCE OF WAR
72Problems of Loyalty
77Friends, Families, and Fighting
81Divided Loyalties
88The Fortunes—and Misfortunes—of War
93Women and the War
101Chapter Four BUILDING GOVERNMENTS: REVOLUTIONS IN GOVERNMENT
102The Problems of Peace
108Economic Successes and Failures
111Constructing and Reconstructing Governments
118Reconstituting the Federal Government
127Chapter Five THE LIMITS OF LIBERTY: REVOLUTIONS IN SOCIETY AND CULTURE
128The Religious Revolution
133Changing Ways of Worship
138Liberty, But Not for All
146Honorable Daughters of America
155Chapter Six: Picture Essay PAUL REVERE: CRAFTSMAN OF THE REVOLUTION
156The Making of an Artisan
158The Making of a Revolutionary
160The Midnight Ride
161The Post-Revolutionary Businessman
163Chapter Seven THE LIVING REVOLUTION: THE REVOLUTION REMEMBERED
164Commemorations and Celebrations
172American Anniversaries
176The Political Uses of the Revolution
184The American Revolution Beyond America
192TIMELINE
194FURTHER READING
197TEXT CREDITS
199PICTURE CREDITS
201INDEX

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