The American Revolution: A History in Documents

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20–21: J. Hector St. John de Crèvecoeur, Letters from an American Farmer and Sketches of Eighteenth-Century America, Albert E. Stone, ed. (Garden City, N.Y.: Dolphin, 1981), n.p.

21–23: Merrill Jensen, English Historical Documents: American Colonial Documents to 1776 (London: Eyre & Spottiswoode, 1955), 650–52.

23–24: Jack P. Greene, Colonies to Nation, 1763–1789: A Documentary History of the American Revolution (New York: Norton, 1975), 60–61.

24–27: Greene, Colonies to Nation, 61–63.

27–29: John Dickinson, Letters from a Farmer in Pennsylvania (Boston: Mein & Fleming, 1768), 13–19, 75–78.

29–31: Jensen, American Colonial Documents, 742–44.

31–34: Jensen, American Colonial Documents, 750–53.

34–36: Hezekiah Niles, Chronicles of the American Revolution, Alden T. Vaughan, ed. (New York: Grosset and Dunlap, 1965), 66–67.

36–38: B. B. Thatcher, A Retrospect of the Boston TeaParty, with a Memoir of George R. T. Hewes, a Survivor of the Little Band of Patriots Who Drowned the Tea in Boston Harbour in 1773. (New York: S. S. Bliss, 1834), 38–41.

39: Peter Force, American Archives, 4th series (Washington, D.C.: M. St. Clair Clarke and Peter Force, 1837), I V, 891.

42–43: Alfred F. Young and Terry J. Fife, with Mary E. Janzen, We the People: Voices and Images of the New Nation (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1993), 44; original pictured, 45.

44: Sheila L. Skemp, Benjamin and William Franklin: Father and Son, Patriot and Loyalist (Boston: Bedford, St. Martin's, 1994), 179–80.

45–46: Jack P. Greene, Colonies to Nation, 255, 258–59.

46–48: Merrill Jensen, English Historical Documents: American Colonial Documents to 1776 (London: Eyre and Spottiswoode, 1955), 851–52.

48–51: Michael Foot and Isaac Kramnick, eds., Thomas Paine Reader (Harmsworth, Middlesex: Penguin, 1987), 66–67, 72, 75, 76, 81–82, 83, 84–85, 87, 92.

52: Greene, Colonies to Nation, 283.

52–53: Hezekiah Niles, Chronicles of the American Revolution, Alden T. Vaughan, ed. (New York: Grosset and Dunlap, 1965), 227.

54: Greene, Colonies to Nation, 296–97.

55–60: Pauline Maier, American Scripture: Making the Declaration of Independence (New York: Knopf, 1997), 236–41.

60: L. H. Butterfield, ed., Letters of Benjamin Rush, 2 vols. (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1951), I, 92.

61–63: John C. Fitzpatrick, ed. The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources (Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1931–1944), VI, 107–11.

63: Niles, Chronicles, 260.

64: New York Historical Society Collections, V, 293–94.

65: Albigence Waldo, [Valley Forge, 1777–1778: Diary of Surgeon Albigence Waldo, of the Connecticut Line,] PMHB, XXI (1897), 313.

66–67: Jonathan R. Dull, A Diplomatic History of the American Revolution (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1985), 165–68.

68–69: Henry Steele Commager and Richard B. Morris, ed., The Spirit of 'Seventy-Six: The Story of the American Revolution as Told by Participants (Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1958), 1243–1245.

69: Commager and Morris, Spirit of 'Seventy-Six, 1282.

72–74: Benjamin Rush, The Autobiography of Benjamin Rush: His [ Travels Through Life] together with His Commonplace Book for 1789–1813. George W. Corner, ed. (Princeton,: Princeton University Press, 1948), 117–19

74–75: Catherine S. Crary, The Price of Loyalty: Tory Writings from the Revolutionary Era (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1973), 205–06.

75–77: Anne Rowe Cunningham, ed., Letters and Diary of John Rowe, Boston Merchant, 1759–1762, 1764–1779 (Boston: W. B. Clarke, 1903), 291–307.

78–79: Benjamin Franklin to William Franklin, August 16, 1784, in Albert H. Smyth, ed., The Writings of Benjamin Franklin (New York: Macmillan, 1906), IX, 252–54.

79–81: Jonathan Bouchier, ed., Reminiscences of an American Loyalist, 1738–1789 (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1925), 121–23.

81: Michael Foot and Isaac Kramnick, eds., Thomas Paine Reader (Harmsworth, Middlesex: Penguin, 1987), 116–17.

82: Hezekiah Niles, Chronicles of the American Revolution. Alden T. Vaughan, ed. (New York: Grosset and Dunlap, 1965), 194–95.

83–85: Wayne Franklin, ed., American Voices, American Lives: A Documentary Reader (New York: Norton, 1997), 283–87

86–87: James E. Seaver, A Narrative of the Life of Mrs. Mary Jemison. June Namias, ed. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1995), 104–05.

87–88: Frederick Cook, ed., Journals of the Military Expedition of Major General John Sullivan Against the Six Nations of Indians in 1779 (Auburn, N.Y.: Knapp, Peck & Thomson, 1887), 30, 32.

89–90: Joseph Plumb Martin, Private Yankee Doodle: Being a Narrative of Some of the Adventures, Dangers and Sufferings of a Revolutionary Soldier. George F. Scheer, ed. (Boston: Little, Brown, 1962), 99–103.

91–92: Andrew Sherburne, Memoirs of Andrew Sherburne: A Pensioner of the Navy of the Revolution (Utica, N.Y.: W. Williams, 1828), 18–20.

93–94: John C. Dann, ed., The Revolution Remembered: Eyewitness Accounts of the War for Independence (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1980), 241–50.

94–95: Curtis Carroll Davis, [A 'Gallantress' Gets Her Due: The Earliest Published Notice of Deborah Sampson.] American Antiquarian Society Proceedings, n.s., 91 (1981), 319–23.

95–96: Henry Steele Commager and Richard B. Morris, eds., The Spirit of 'Seventy-Six: The Story of the American Revolution as Told by Participants (Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1958), 1121–1122.

97–98: [A New Touch on the Times] broadside. reproduced in Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, ['Daughters of Liberty': Religious Women in Revolutionary New England,] Women in the Age of the American Revolution Edited by Ronald Hoffman and Peter J. Albert, (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 1989), 230.

98–99: Adams Family Correspondence, The Adams Papers. Series II. (Cambridge: Belknap Press of Harvard University, 1963), II, 295.

102–04: John C. Fitzpatrick, ed. The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources (Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1931–1944), XXVI, 483–86.

104–05: [Extract of a letter from a gentleman in the western country, to his friend in this city, dated Fort-Fenney, near the Miami, Dec. 22d, 1785.] The New-Haven Gazette, and the Connecticut Magazine, vol. 1, no. 3, (March 2, 1786), 22–23

106–08: Henry Steele Commager and Milton Cantor, ed., Documents of American History (Englewood Cliffs, N. J.: Prentice Hall, 1988), I, 128–32.

108–09: Tench Coxe, A View of the United States of America, in a Series of Papers, Written at Various Times, Between the Years 1787 and 1794 (Philadelphia: W. Hall, 1794), 43–49.

110–11: William Manning, The Key of Liberty: The Life and Democratic Writings of William Manning, 'A Laborer, ' 1747–1814 (Cambridge: Belknap Press of Harvard University, 1993), 164–65.

112–13: Jack P. Greene, Colonies to Nation 339–45.

113–16: Charles Francis Adams, The Works of John Adams (Boston: Little, Brown, 1850–1856), I V, 193–200.

116–18: Greene, Colonies to Nation, 333–34.

119: Michael Kammen, The Origins of The American Constitution: A Documentary History (New York: Penguin, 1986), 65–66.

120–23: Kammen, Origins of the American Constitution, 126–30.

123–25: Mercy Otis Warren, Observations on the New Constitution, and on the Federal and State Conventions (Boston, 1788), 6–12.

-197-

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