China's English: A History of English in Chinese Education

By Bob Adamson | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

My thanks are due to many people who helped me in the course of writing this book, and I would especially like to acknowledge the assistance given to me by Liu Daoyi, Tang Jun, Liu Jinfang, Ying Manrong, Wei Guodong and staff at the People's Education Press in Beijing, who were exceptionally generous with their time and facilitated this study in many ways, including allowing me to incorporate extracts from their English language textbooks. Bonnie Zhang Wenxia helped with translation work and a range of tedious chores with skill, efficiency and good humour; while (in alphabetical order) Kingsley Bolton, David Bunton, Jo Carr, Angus Cheng Yeung Chuen, Greg Fairbrother, Neville Grant, Peter Gu Yongqi, Gu Yueguo, Ko Po Yuk, Winnie Auyeung Lai, John Lee Chi Kin, Lee Wing On, Julian Leung Yat Ming, Jo Lewkowicz, Philip Sampson, Anthony Sweeting, Elizabeth Walker, Ye Yuankai and Angel Yu Lai King all rendered valuable assistance. Two anonymous reviewers also provided detailed and construcdve comments on a draft of this book. In particular, I owe tremendous debts of gratitude to Paul Morris, for his sharp insights and constant encouragement; and to Annie Tong and Jack and Kathleen Adamson for their unflagging support.

I am grateful to the various publishers for permission to reproduce material from my papers that had been published in their journals. Chapter 2 draws upon 'Barbarian as Foreign Language: English in China's Schools', World Englishes 21(2) (July 2002) published by Blackwell Publishing; parts of Chapter 7 appeared in 'English with Chinese Characteristics: China's New Curriculum', Asia Pacific Journal of Education 21 (2) (September 2001) published by the National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University and Oxford University Press; and several chapters draw on data that appeared in 'Constructing an Official English for China, 1949-2000' (co-written with Ora Kwo), Asia Pacific Journal of Communication 12(1) (July 2002), published by John Benjamins Publishing Co.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
China's English: A History of English in Chinese Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Editor's Preface vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Note on Transliteration xi
  • 1: Introduction 1
  • 2: Barbarian as a Foreign Language 21
  • 3: The Soviet Influence, 1949–60 35
  • 4: Towards Quality in Education, 1961–66 79
  • 5: The Cultural Revolution, 1966–76 107
  • 6: Modernization under Deng Xiaoping, 1977–93 129
  • 7: Integrating with Globalization, 1993 Onwards 169
  • 8: China's English 195
  • Appendix 211
  • Notes 215
  • References 219
  • Index 227
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 242

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.