China's English: A History of English in Chinese Education

By Bob Adamson | Go to book overview

Notes

CHAPTER 1

1. To distinguish between the language and the school subject, this book uses 'English language' for the former and 'English Language' for the latter.

2. Details of the data collection are as follows. Liu Daoyi: 10–13 June 1994 (informal discussions); 16 August 1994 (discussions and tour of PEP archives); 15 December 1995 (semi-structured interview); 16 December 1995 (informal discussion); 1822 May 1996 (discussions); 22 May 1996 (semi-structured interview); 6 November 996 (discussion); 3 April 1997, 22 July 1997, 25 November 1997 (letters responding to queries); 15 May 1998 (discussion); 21 May 1998 (discussion). Most of our interactions were in English. Liu Daoyi also read and commented on my PhD thesis that forms the basis for this book. Tang Jun: 12 July 1995 (22-page memoir and a letter, both in Chinese, responding to queries); 22 March 1998 (letter in English responding to queries). In both instances, Tangjun also liaised with Ying Manrong and Fan Ying, clarifying issues concerning the 1957 curriculum. Liu Jinfang: 17 December 1997 (discussion); 15 May 1998 (semi-structured interview). Interactions were conducted in English and Chinese (for reiteration and clarification). Neville Grant: 18–30 June 1998 (email correspondence). During our periodical meetings over more than ten years, Grant took an interest in my study and offered useful insights and lines of investigation. My own reflections on the development of the 1993 curriculum were written up as a journal article (i.e., Adamson, 1995).


CHAPTER 3

1. Tang Jun, memoir, 12 July 1995.

2. In a discussion with Tang Jun, reported in Tang Jun, letter, 22 March 1998.

3. Tangjun, memoir, 12 July 1995.

4. In a discussion with Tang Jun, reported in Tang Jun, letter, 22 March 1998.

5. In a discussion with Tang Jun, reported in Tang Jun, letter, 12 July 1995.

6. Bibliographical details of textbooks are found in a separate section of the References at the end of this book.

-215-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
China's English: A History of English in Chinese Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 242

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.