Creative Children, Imaginative Teaching

By Florence Beetlestone | Go to book overview

1
'This creative messing about
is all very well, but
what about the 3 Rs?'
Creativity and learning

Cameo 1

Nicola, aged 7, is busy in the art corner. She is making a card.
She has decided to use a variety of materials to stick to the
front — pieces of material cut raggedly, some sequins, scraps of
coloured paper, wool, lentils and seeds. She is totally absorbed
in her efforts, working alone, not noticing that it is time to
clear up. She appears to be attracted to the patterns she is
making. She opens the finished card and writes carefully 'to my
teacher … love from Nicola'. She then fits the card tightly
inside an envelope she has made earlier. Several of her finished
envelopes are nearby.


Cameo 2

Children in a Year 4 class are studying aspects about Russia.
The teacher has decided to introduce the topic in an
imaginative way. The children begin by examining a wooden
bear puppet which can be manipulated by strings, an artefact
made in Russia. The children are encouraged to consider its
aesthetic qualities, the way it has been crafted and to consider
their feelings about it. Their emotional response to the topic is
immediate: 'I like the way the lines have been cut on the bear
to make it look like fur'; 'I think the person who made it really
cared about making it'. The class sit in a circle on the floor.
The bear is passed around the circle with each child

-9-

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