Creative Children, Imaginative Teaching

By Florence Beetlestone | Go to book overview

5
'I'Tm not creative myself
Creativity and originality

Cameo I

Lesley has a lively Year 2 class. Her room has many artefacts
and resources arranged so that there is a feel of a workshop
about it. Children are busy in all areas. Casim is typing a
Funnybones story on the computer; four children are busy
cutting out photos of themselves as babies and toddlers for a
time line, while Stephen is already mounting his photo in a
zigzag book. A line of finished paintings hangs overhead. Four
children are moving busily around the room measuring items
and recording data on their clipboards. Two girls are doing a
survey about school dinners, while two more are closely
observing the tulips in a vase perched rather precariously on
the edge of the table next to the hamster. Six children are
busy marking, cutting and sawing as they make up boxes they
have designed. Sarah is reading quietly in the imaginative play
area. Somewhere amidst all the quietly productive hive of
activity, Lesley is working with a group of children discussing
their writing about foods beneficial to growth. The children all
know what they are doing and Lesley keeps careful notes on
their activities and progress.


Cameo 2

Julia's Year I class are enthusiastic about all areas of the
curriculum. She has a particular approach which involves
exploring imaginative ways of recording. Much work is done as
a whole class working in pairs, which Julia finds is a supportive
way of encouraging learning. Some of the children are printing
and then using felt tip pens to draw on images, producing a

-93-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Creative Children, Imaginative Teaching
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 158

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.