Understanding Desistance from Crime: Emerging Theoretical Directions in Resettlement and Rehabilitation

By Stephen Farrall; Adam Calverley | Go to book overview

chapter three
The longer term impact of probation
supervision

'Advise, assist, befriend' or 'talk to, chivvy along, raise the consciousness of'?
Probation: leaving good roads open
Offender management or rehabilitating offenders?
Discussion

If I was in a club and I was pissed up I wouldn't think 'ummm, I'd
better not get in a fight 'cos I'm on probation and I don't want to go
to prison no more'. It wouldn't enter my head.

(Anthony, sweep two interview)

It [anger management] was a load of bollocks. You sit there with
eight or nine other kiddies, just discussing stupid things, like I just
said. Like stupid questions. Or like, they give you a form, you go
there every week, they give you a form, you have to tick the box 'how
you feel today' and all that kind of thing, 'what's wound you up that
week' and stuff like that. Stupid things really.

(Anthony, sweep three interview)

I wouldn't say anything's [that probation officer said] stuck with me
but it chipped away if you know what I mean, it sort of chips away at
you. [Right]. They don't stick in your head but occasionally you'll get
that little thought of 'maybe I shouldn't do this because I've …'. And
maybe he told me about this or … you know what I mean? It chips
away at you I suppose.

(Anthony, sweep four interview),

There have been very few studies of the long term impacts of probation interventions. Furthermore, most of those that have taken a longer term perspective usually involve solely analysing conviction data. For example,

-42-

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