Understanding Desistance from Crime: Emerging Theoretical Directions in Resettlement and Rehabilitation

By Stephen Farrall; Adam Calverley | Go to book overview

chapter six
Citizenship values and desistance

Why study citizenship and crime?

A criminologically informed notion of citizenship

Socialization and resocialization towards citizenship values

Desistance and citizenship

Operationalizing and measuring citizenship

Accounting for the relationship between citizenship values and desistance

Summary

Here's the deal here. Hugh Benny has reformed his wayward life and
has become a born-again Good Citizen.

(Vincent Hannah, Heat, 1996, Michael Mann)

In Michael Mann's film Heat, the mean-talking police detective Vincent Hannah, as part of an ongoing case and in order to extract information relating to that investigation, assaults a known 'face', Hugh Benny. Having extracted the information he needs, Hannah then calls one of his colleagues to relay what he has learnt from Benny. Benny lies at Hannah's feet, bloody and bruised, looking semi-conscious whilst Hannah utters the lines above. Benny's 'reform' looks enforced and he himself hardly looks the model of a 'good citizen'. In the film, we neither see nor hear of Benny again. His 'reform', such that it was, remains problematic for all sorts of reasons.

Recently, the relationship between being a 'good citizen' and one's involvement (or otherwise) in crime has drawn much interest from criminologists (e.g. Young, 1999; McNeill, 2000; Karstedt and Farrall, forthcoming). Despite the inherent 'logic' of exploring the relationship between citizenship and engagement in offending, very few of these authors explicitly outline why they believe it important (or relevant) to link the concept of citizenship with patterns of offending. In many respects too, we feel, these investigations are carried out in absentia from the messiness and complexities of data and, to some degree therefore,

-131-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Understanding Desistance from Crime: Emerging Theoretical Directions in Resettlement and Rehabilitation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 230

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.