Apollo Moon Missions: The Unsung Heroes

By Billy Watkins | Go to book overview

3 RICHARD UNDERWOOD
NASA Chief of Photography

Richard Underwood had just finished processing the precious film brought back by earth's first moonwalkers, Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, when he realized something was missing.

He hurriedly looked again through the hundreds of images taken on the night of July 20, 1969. Then he looked again… and again. There was plenty of Aldrin—saluting the U.S. flag, scooping up soil samples, standing on the ridge of small craters. But nowhere could Underwood find a picture of Armstrong.

“I told one of the lab technicians,” Underwood recalls. “He said, 'Aw, they're in those spacesuits. They both look alike.' Then we got the film dry and looked at it. Sure enough, none of Neil. Buzz didn't take any.”

It created a nightmare for NASA's public relations office. “In a meeting, there were people from “public affairs” who said, 'Look, this one of Aldrin standing by the flag? Let's just say it's Neil Armstrong. You can't see his face.'” Underwood says. “I quickly told them, 'Yeah, but there's some nine-year-old groupie out there who understands these space suits as well as the people who made them. And if you say that, three days from now there will be a letter in the New York Times saying, 'You're full of crap, that's Buzz Aldrin.' So they just decided not to say anything.

“And the amazing thing is, the news media never asked about it. Year after year, no one ever said a thing about it.”

Underwood, who now gives speeches about the Apollo moon missions for Crystal Cruise Lines, says his audiences are stunned when he tells them there are no pictures of Neil Armstrong walking on the moon.

-25-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Apollo Moon Missions: The Unsung Heroes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 202

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.