Patent Law Essentials: A Concise Guide

By Alan L. Durham | Go to book overview

Note on Sources

In any area of the law, there is no substitute for the original sources. In the specific case of patent law, the primary source is Title 35 of the United States Code, known as the Patent Act. Several one-volume references reproduce the Patent Act and other selected legislation concerning copyright and trademark law. A good example is Selected Statutes and International Agreements on Unfair Competition, Trademark, Copyright and Patent, edited by Paul Goldstein and Edmund W. Kitch and published by Foundation Press. Rules and regulations specifically relating to patent applications and prosecution can be found in Title 37 of the Code of Federal Regulations, published by the Office of the Federal Register, National Archives and Records, and the Manual of Patent Examining Procedure (or MPEP), published by the Department of Commerce. All of these materials can now be conveniently located online at the Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) Web site: http:// www.uspto.gov/main/patents.htm.

Judicial opinions cited in this book can be found in any good law library or through electronic resources such as Lexis or Westlaw. Supreme Court decisions are found in the United States Reports (abbreviated in case citations as U.S.) published by West Publishing Co. Published decisions of the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals are found in West's Federal Reporter(F.2d or F.3d). District Court opinions are found in West's Federal Supplement (F. Supp.), or BNA's United States Patent Quarterly (U.S.P.Q. or U.S.P.Q.2d).

Several multivolume treatises provide very detailed surveys of United States patent law, including its historical development. The one the author turns to most frequently is Professor Donald S. Chisum's Chisum on Patents, published by Matthew Bender. Ernest Bainbridge Lipscomb's Lipscomb's Walker on Patents, published by Clark Boardman Callaghan, is also a

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