Just Schools: A Whole School Approach to Restorative Justice

By Belinda Hopkins | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

First, I would like to thank everyone with whom I have worked over the past ten years or so in the field of conflict management, circle time, alternatives to violence, mediation and restorative justice. I have tried to mention direct sources of inspiration, but over the years it becomes difficult to remember where all the different ideas have come from. I acknowledge that the ingredients here come from many sources, and my contribution is to have cooked them up into a new dish called 'Just Schools'.

I owe a huge debt of thanks to the international restorative justice community, many of whom have known that I have been writing this book, and have sent me ideas and encouraging e-mails. Some people have even been kind enough to read bits of the book as I have been struggling over them. I want to mention particularly Nancy Riestenberg and Annie Warner Roberts in the United States, and Marg Thorsborne, Marg Armstrong, Brenda Morrison, Di Margetts and Peta Blood in Australia. How wonderful to learn from, and be supported by, such a powerful, visionary group of women.

It is also important to mention the influence and encouragement of seminal thinkers and practitioners like Terry O'Connell, Howard Zehr, David Moore and John Braithwaite who have been generous with their time and ideas, either face to face or by e-mail.

Closer to home, I want to thank those people I think of as my restorative justice family, the people who have encouraged me and given me so many opportunities to try out my ideas and develop my thinking – Charles Pollard, Debbie Hewer, Tony and Kathryn Walker, Maggie Kelly, Nic Brennan, Nicky Preston, Mel Lofty, Jackie Keyser, Sue Raikes, Patsy Townsend, Chris Harman, Richard Newcombe, Gordon Richardson, Graham Waddington, Hilary Cremin, Eemonn Keenan and, recently, Gary Fletcher and Mandy Watkins.

I want to thank Edmund Burke, Tom Heydeman and Hilary Reed, who took the time to read chapters and discuss them with me. I also want to thank the many friends who listened to me and picked me up when my confidence faltered, helping me to believe in myself and in the book – Nic Bayley, Amanda James, Morag (Miffy) Scally, Kirsty Dabbs, Fiona Elwell, John Mulligan, Dave Hamilton, Chris Kiely, Tim Carroll and Peter Burton. Many more friends have simply helped me by being there, and reminding me there is more to life than restorative justice (I humour them!). They are too many to mention, and I almost surely would miss someone out. I can only say how lucky I am to know them all.

-10-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Just Schools: A Whole School Approach to Restorative Justice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 209

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.