Just Schools: A Whole School Approach to Restorative Justice

By Belinda Hopkins | Go to book overview

Foreword

I believe that this book could soon become a critically important restorative justice text, and deservedly so. It should prove valuable to both newcomers to restorative practice, and to experienced practitioners. There are many excellent books about restorative justice available; however, the key focus of this book is entirely different – it is a book about the values, and skills, that underpin all restorative practice. Furthermore, this book explores how individuals within communities can transform their daily interactions for the positive, so that all can feel more valued, as well as how they deal with the inevitable conflicts that will occur. Belinda has chosen to demonstrate how this transformation can be achieved within a school community, but the principles and techniques described are equally applicable to other organisations. The true importance of this book is that it sets down, in a readily accessible style and format, how any community can begin to change how they interact with one another, and deal with conflict in a socially inclusive manner.

This book has been written close to 25 years after the first restorative justice projects were pioneered in criminal justice. Since these first projects were developed in the mid to late 1970s in Canada and North America, the range and breadth of restorative justice practice has grown significantly. These projects were attempting to introduce an entirely different way of working within the criminal justice system. The methods developed valued empowerment, communication and repair. It quickly became recognised that many victims need to be listened to and to have their say (often to the person responsible for the harm done), and that many offenders, given the opportunity, were willing to meet the people harmed by their actions, to talk through the impact of their actions and accept responsibility to do something to put things right as best they could. Rather than offenders being passive recipients of sentencing outcomes, and victims sidelined to appearing as trial witnesses (if needed), restorative ap

-12-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Just Schools: A Whole School Approach to Restorative Justice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 209

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.