Science Units for Grades 9-12

By Randy L. Bell; Joe Garofalo et al. | Go to book overview

chapter 1
Guidelines for Integrating
Technology in Science Instruction

RANDY L. BELL AND JOE GAROFALO

An interesting disconnect has taken place in science education in the past 20 years. In nearly every science discipline, new technologies have pushed advances in scientific knowledge to unprecedented levels. The Hubble telescope has allowed scientists to peer farther into the universe than ever before. Scientists use particle accelerators in their work with subatomic particles to probe the very structure of matter. The Human Genome Project has depended on computers to parse mind-boggling masses of data on DNA. Yet, in the majority of K-12 classrooms where our students are learning about science, the advantages of computer technology are virtually ignored.

You have no doubt heard about Larry Cuban's book, Oversold and Underused, in which he found that less than 5% of teachers integrated computer technology into their regular curricular and instructional routines (Cuban, 2001, p. 133). This finding is not surprising. Few K-12 science teachers have ever had the chance to observe effective uses of technology to teach science content, so they do not have a vision for how it fits into their instruction.

Of course, technology can be used in the classroom merely for its own sake. Technology enthusiasts have been accused of advocating any and every use of technology without regard to its effectiveness or pedagogical soundness. We are advocating quite the opposite view. In many situations, technology makes no sense in the science classroom. However, we have found that technology, when used appropriately, can move science learning from the realm of rote memorization to conceptual understanding. Computer technologies can help students go beyond cookbook-style [experiments] to visualize the invisible, transcend time, and experience the inquiry that drives real-life science.

This book provides you, the science teacher, with appropriate models for enhancing your science teaching with technology. The activities encourage students to understand, question, and explore. We begin by describing four guidelines for integrating technology in your science instruction. The guidelines reflect what we believe to be appropriate uses of technology to enhance and extend student learning. These guidelines are adapted from our similar guidelines for integrating technology in science and mathematics teacher preparation courses, which can be found in Flick and Bell (2000) and Garofalo, Drier, Harper, Timmerman, and Shockey (2000), respectively. These guidelines are intended to help teachers design instruction that takes advantage of technology's potential. They also framed the thinking of our authors as they developed the individual units in this book.

-9-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Science Units for Grades 9-12
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 282

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.