Courts, Liberalism, and Rights: Gay Law and Politics in the United States and Canada

By Jason Pierceson | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

THIS BOOK IS the result of several years of support and assistance from numerous sources. Many people deserve thanks. At Brandeis University, Jeffrey Abramson trusted me and provided much-appreciated freedom but also invaluable feedback at critical times. Steven Teles provided a tremendous amount of formal and informal support, suggesting crucial new literature and often providing a needed critical perspective. Elizabeth Bussiere, in addition to being a kind and supportive colleague while I taught at University of Massachusetts–Boston, provided remarkably detailed and substantive feedback as an outside reader. Her assistance was crucial in turning the manuscript into a book. I am also grateful to Craig Rimmerman who took a strong interest in this project and to the Temple University Press reviewers who provided important and insightful comments that strengthened this book. Thank you as well to those who reviewed various chapters of the book that I presented at conferences, including Keith Bybee, Caren Dubnoff, Frederick Lewis, and Ronen Shamir. I also had useful discussions about the book with Ellen Andersen and Anna-Maria Marshall.

There were others who were crucial to the success of this project. Shep Melnick's seminar on courts at Boston College first sparked an interest to explore the questions in this book. His questions and feedback on a seminar paper led to the compilation of the manuscript for this book. At Brandeis, Sidney Milkis deserves credit for the focus in this book on new institutionalist approaches, and Mark Hulliung did much to shape my views on liberalism. I am particularly indebted to him for introducing me to the work of J. David Greenstone. Richard and Linda Hayes deserve much credit for encouraging me to place U.S. politics in a comparative context. Research for this book was facilitated by financial support from the Politics Department and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Brandeis. Thanks also to the Faculty Development Program at St. Norbert College and the Faculty Publication Fund. Finally, thank you to my partner, Dylan White, for supporting me and dealing kindly with me as I prepared this book and to my family and friends for their support and encouragement, especially Jason Phillip and Eiren Caffall for crucial editing.

-vii-

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Courts, Liberalism, and Rights: Gay Law and Politics in the United States and Canada
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • 1: Introduction 1
  • 2: U.S. Federal Courts and Gay Rights a History of Hesitancy 21
  • 3: Liberalism and Gay Politics 33
  • 4: Toward a Better Liberalism 49
  • 5: Sodomy Laws, Courts, and Liberalism 62
  • 6: Lessons from Continued Sodomy Adjudication 77
  • 7: Courts and Same-Sex Marriage in the United States 104
  • 8: Courts and Same-Sex Marriage in the United States 130
  • 9: Developments After Vermont 144
  • 10: Canada 165
  • 11: Courts, Social Change, and the Power of Legal Liberalism 187
  • 12: Conclusion 195
  • Notes 199
  • Index 247
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