Pennsylvania Politics and the Growth of Democracy: 1740- 1776

By Theodore Thayer | Go to book overview

III
GOVERNOR HAMILTON. 1748-1754

C ONTRARY TO EXPECTATION, James Hamilton did not experience a pleasant and placid life as Governor of Pennsylvania. In fact, after six years, he gave up the office, a disappointed and disillusioned man. Hamilton was the son of a more famous father, Andrew Hamilton, who had given memorable services to the province as a lawyer of distinction and Speaker of the Assembly. The Hamiltons were Scotch and members of the Episcopalian Church. Although a man of ability, James had a conservative frame of mind which kept him narrowly loyal to the Penns and quite unappreciative of the desires as well as the capabilities of the average citizen of Pennsylvania.

Prior to becoming Lieutenant-Governor in 1748, Hamilton had been prothonotary of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, a member of the Assembly for five years, Mayor of Philadelphia, and a member of the Governor's Council. Thus, when he became the Penns' Deputy-Governor at the age of thirty-eight, he was a man of maturity with a good background of political experience.

The question which caused James Hamilton ceaseless trouble and embarrassment during his term of office, and finally prompted him to resign, was that of paper money. The history of paper money or bills of credit, as they were called, goes back to 1723 in Pennsylvania. That year the Assembly authorized the emission of £45,000, in bills of credit, to provide a circulating medium in an economy where gold and silver were almost non-existent, as a result of unfavorable balance of trade with Great Britain and the attraction which that money market offered for specie.

During times of war, bills of credit went directly into circulation as the money was laid out for military uses. At other times they were put into circulation through loans from a government agency in the form of mortgages on real estate and other property.1 The fact that the currency appeared to stimulate business convinced the people that paper money was a blessing to a country starved by a lack of specie. The law made the bills legal tender for all debts equal to sterling. Naturally this provision was disliked by the Proprietors, whose collections in Pennsylvania were depreciated because paper money never attained a par with sterling. British merchants, many of whom had sustained losses through the excessive issues of bills of credit in New England

____________________
1
Root, 189. See Statutes, III, 389ff.

-25-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Pennsylvania Politics and the Growth of Democracy: 1740- 1776
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 238

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.