Nathan B. Young and the Struggle over Black Higher Education

By Antonio F. Holland | Go to book overview

INDEX
Adamson, Α. Μ., 116
Alabama: illiteracy in, 64–66; Ku Klux Klan violence, 5–6
Alabama Penny Savings and Loan Company, 178–79
Alabama State Normal School, 44
Alabama State Teachers' Association (for Negroes), 30, 32, 43–44, 63, 70, 189
Alexandria, Ala., 15
Allen, Benjamin F., 120–24
Allen, C, 116
Allen, Mary, 134
American Missionary Association, 10, 11, 117, 196
Anderegg, Frederick, 23
Anderson, Charles, 137
Anti-Tuberculosis League, 187
Appling, Ala., 13
Archer, M., 15
Association of Colleges for Negro Youth, 145–46
Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, 174, 207
Atlanta College, 60, 198, 203
Atlanta Conference on Negro Life, Fourth Annual, 178
Atlanta Cotton State and International Exposition, 43, 52
Atlanta Exposition Address (1895), 48, 51–52, 56, 197
Babcock, K. C, 80–81
Baker, Sam Α., 125–26, 156, 158–60, 162–65, 168–69, 201
Bank, Frank D., 184
Barksdale, Norval, 138
Bartlett Vocational School, 155. See also Dalton Vocational School
Bates, Langston, 138, 140
Bay Shore Summer Resort, 184
Benton Barracks (St. Louis), 115
Birmingham, Ala., 3, 178
Bishop, William, 117
Blackiston, Henry S., 138
Blue, Cecil Α., 139
Boston, 178
Bowen, G. H., 184
Bowles, Frank E., 132–33
Brand, James, 23
Brawley, Benjamin, 84
Brinson J. H., 91, 104
Bristol, Va., 4
Brown, B. Gratz, 117
Brown, Henry (Rev.), 10
Brown, Henry, 116
Brown, Sterling, 138, 165–66
Bruce, N. C, 155–56, 168
Bureau of Education (Washington, D.C.), 80, 90
Capital Trust and Investment Company, 184
Carnegie, Andrew, 78, 86
Caulfield, Henry, 168–70, 173, 174, 202, 204
Chamberlin, William B., 20
Chariton County, Mo., 155
Chatham, Va., 1, 3, 4
Chattanooga, Tenn., 3
Chester Kirkley School, 15
Churchill, Charles H., 20–22

-231-

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