The Italian-American Vote in Providence, Rhode Island, 1916-1948

By Stefano Luconi | Go to book overview

3
Rhode Island Politics and the Italian-
American Vote before World War I

POST-CIVIL WAR RHODE ISLAND IN GENERAL AND PROVIDENCE IN particular were Republican bailiwicks. Both of them remained GOP strongholds until the Depression of the 1930s although the state had witnessed a steady rise of its share of potentially Democratic-oriented working-class population since the 1870s. Rhode Island elected its governor every year until 1912 and, after this date, every two years. Sixty-five gubernatorial elections were, therefore, held from 1856 through 1930. Still the Democratic candidate was the winner only eight times, namely the Republican Party won almost 90 percent of the gubernatorial contests over a span of three-fourths of a century. In particular, prior to 1932, only three Democrats served as governors after the turn of the century: Lucius F. C. Garvin from 1903 to 1905, James H. Higgins from 1907 to 1909, and William S. Flynn from 1923 to 1925. Moreover, before Democratic presidential candidate Alfred E. Smith carried Rhode Island in 1928, as few as three other Democratic candidates had come on top in the races for the White House at the state level since the establishment of their party: Martin Van Buren in 1836, Franklin Pierce in 1852, and Woodrow Wilson in 1912. In 1916, although the state went Republican, Wilson was also the only Democratic standard bearer to receive a majority of the vote in a presidential contest in the city of Providence between 1896 and 1928.1

In Rhode Island, the Republican Party was the expression of the interests of the state's [Yankee] industrial establishment made up of White Anglo-Saxon Protestants. Association with southern secessionism quite naturally impaired Democratic candidates' chances of success in the 1860s and 1870s, while the GOP stood out as the symbol of national unity and patriotism. Nonetheless it was the support for a high protective tariff on industrial products as

-28-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Italian-American Vote in Providence, Rhode Island, 1916-1948
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 191

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.