The Italian-American Vote in Providence, Rhode Island, 1916-1948

By Stefano Luconi | Go to book overview

Notes

CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION

1. Mary Ann Sorrentino, [Pastore Led Us from the Wilderness,] Providence Journal, 18 July 2000, B6; Richard Goldstein, [John Pastore, Longtime Rhode Island Politician, Dies at 93,] New York Times, 16 July 2000, 30(N); Scott MacKay, [Mourners Remember Pastore as a Friend, Family Man, Patriot,] Providence Journal, 18 July 2000, B5(F).

2. [A Giant Among Orators,] New York Times, 25 August 1964, 22(N).Strictly speaking, as a governor of Italian ancestry, Pastore was preceded by William Paca in Maryland in 1782, Andrew H. Longino in Mississippi in 1900, and Alfred E. Smith and Charles Poletti in New York State in 1919 and 1942 respectively. Yet Paca's family immigrated to Maryland from England although some of his ancestors may have arrived in this latter country from Italy. Longino was a Baptist, married a Wasp woman, and had no ties to an Italian-American community. Smith's Italian ancestry on the part of his paternal grandfather was discovered after he died. Lieutenant Governor Poletti became New York State's chief executive ex officio to fill the last month of Governor Herbert Lehman unexpired term upon this latter's resignation to assume the office of U.S. director of foreign relief during World War II and did not run for election in his own right. Pastore, too, rose to the governorship after his predecessor, J. Howard McGrath, resigned in 1945, but he subsequently won election to remain in office the following year. For Pastore, see Thomas DiMauro, [The Pioneer,] in Dream Streets: The Big Book of ItalianAmerican Culture, ed. Lawrence DiStasi (New York: Harper & Row, 1989), 215; Ruth S. Morgenthau, Pride Without Prejudice: The Life of John O. Pastore (Providence: Rhode Island Historical Society, 1989); Frank J. Cavaioli, [Pastore, John Orlando,] in The Italian American Experience: An Encyclopedia, ed. Salvatore J. LaGumina et al. (New York: Garland, 2000), 447–48. For Paca, see Giovanni Schiavo, The Italians in America before the Revolution (New York: Vigo Press, 1976), 72–77; Valentine J. Belfiglio, [Italians and the American Revolution,] Italian Americana 3, no. 1 (Autumn 1976): 7–12. For Longino, see Frank J. Cavaioli, [Andrew Houston Longino,] Italian Americana 11, no. 2 (Spring-Summer 1993): 170–78. For Smith, see Matthew Josephson and Hannah Josephson, Al Smith, Hero of the Cities: A Political Portrait Drawing on the Papers of Francis Perkins (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1969), 14–15; Joseph Marc Di Leo, [Governor Alfred Emanuel Smith, Multi-Ethnic Politician,] in Italians and Irish in America, ed. Francis X. Femminella (Staten Island, NY: American Italian Historical Associa-

-136-

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The Italian-American Vote in Providence, Rhode Island, 1916-1948
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Acknowledgments 7
  • 1: Introduction 11
  • 2: The Setting 19
  • 3: Rhode Island Politics and the Italian-American Vote Before World War I 28
  • 4: The Postwar Decade 49
  • 5: The Depression Years 71
  • 6: The Late New Deal and the Impact of World War II and Its Aftermath 91
  • 7: Conclusion 120
  • 8: A Methodological Note on Electoral Sources 132
  • Notes 136
  • Bibliography 168
  • Index 186
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