The Virginia State Constitution: A Reference Guide

By John Dinan | Go to book overview

Bibliographical Essay

PART I: THE CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY OF VIRGINIA

Because there are no recorded debates of the Convention of 1776, scholars have had to piece together the arguments from the journal (Proceedings of the Convention of Delegates, Held at the Capitol, in the City of Williamsburg in the Colony of Virginia, onMonday the 6th of May, 1776“Williamsburg: Alexander Purdie, 1776”) as well as from papers of the participants. For a comprehensive documentary record of this convention, as well as the preceding conventions, see William J. Van Schreeven, Robert L. Scribner, and Brent Tarter, comps. and eds., Revolutionary Virginia: The Road to Independence; A Documentary Record, 1vols. (Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1973–1983), esp. vol. 7, parts 1 and 2, which focus on the 1776 Convention. Drafts of various proposed constitutions are available in Julian P. Boyd, ed., The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, 31 vols. (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1950–), 1:329–386. Meanwhile, Edmund Randolph's account of the convention proceedings has been published as “Edmund Randolph's Essay on the Revolutionary History of Virginia, 1774–1782,” Virginia Magazine of History and Biography AA (January 1936): 35–50. Analyses of the work of the convention include H. A. Washington, The Virginia Constitution of 1776: A Discourse Delivered before the Virginia Historical Society at Their Annual Meeting, January 17th, 1852 (Richmond: MacFarlane & Ferguson, 1852); Hugh Blair Grigsby, The Virginia Convention of 1776 (1855; reprint, New York: Da Capo Press, 1969); Kate Mason Rowland, The Life of George Mason, 1725–1792, 2 vols. (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1892), 1:228–266; W. F. Dunaway Jr., “The Virginia Conventions of the Revolution,” Virginia Law Register10 (November 1904): 567–586; Robert L. Hilldrup, “The Virginia Convention of 1776: A Study in Revolutionary Politics” (Ph.D. diss., University of Virginia, 1935); Irving Brant, James Madison, 6 vols. (Indianapolis, Ind.: Bobbs-Merrill, 1941–1961), 1:190–271; George B. Oliver, “A Constitutional History of Virginia, 1776–1860” (Ph.D. diss., Duke University, 1959), pp. 12–54; A. E. Dick Howard, 'For the Common Benefit': Constitutional History in Virginia as a Casebook for the Modern Constitution-Maker,”

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