An Illustrated Chinese Materia Medica

By Jing-Nuan Wu | Go to book overview

Glossary

By Guang Hong

Blood Deficiency: Blood deficiency refers to the failure of Blood to nourish the vessels due to decreased quality of Blood. The signs include pallor or sallow complexion, pale lips, dizziness, palpitations and insomnia, numbness of the hands and feet, pale tongue, and empty pulse.

Blood Heat: see Invasion of Blood by Heat.

Blood: Blood is one of the basic life materials, the red fluid that circulates in the vessels. Nevertheless, the Blood in traditional Chinese medicine is not the same as what the West calls blood. As indicated, the Blood is a product of nourishing Qi, transformed from food Essence. It transports nutrients to the entire body and is the material basis for mental activities.

Body Fluid: Body fluid is a basic component of the body including, but not limited to, saliva, stomach fluids, synovial fluid, tissue fluids and excretions. The function of the Body Fluid is to keep the tissues and organs moist, to assure proper elimination of wastes, to maintain a normal body temperature, and to regulate the balance of Yin and Yang in the body.

Channel: In the meridian system, channel is the main trunks that run longitudinally and interiorly-exteriorly with the body.

Cold Pattern: Cold pattern is characterized by a lowered body temperature, intolerance of cold and preference for heat, absence of thirst (or preference for sips of hot beverages). Exterior-Cold shows aversion to cold, absence of perspiration, a thin, white coating on the tongue, and a floating pulse. Interior-Cold shows loose stools, clear profuse urine, cold limbs, pallor, a pale tongue with white coating, and a slow, deep, weak, or a tight pulse.

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An Illustrated Chinese Materia Medica
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 3
  • Illustrated Materia Medica 31
  • Appendix 671
  • Selected Bibliography 683
  • Glossary 685
  • Latin (Pharmaceutical) Name Index 695
  • English Name Index 701
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