Coretta Scott King Award Books: Using Great Literature with Children and Young Adults

By Claire Gatrell Stephens | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Personal Acknowledgments

Craig L. Stephens and Danielle Stephens

Orange County Library System, Orlando, Florida

Julie Gatrell

Kate Harmon, Language Arts Teacher, Glenridge Middle School, Orange County Public Schools, Orlando, Florida

Bill Mays, Language Arts Teacher, Glenridge Middle School, Orange County Public Schools, Orlando, Florida

Amy Torres, Teacher of the Gifted, Walker Middle School, Orange County Public Schools, Orlando, Florida

Sandie Moore, Lonnie Holt, and Terri Sillito, Media Clerks, Walker Middle School, Orange County Public Schools, Orlando, Florida

Keith Kyker whose constant question [So Claire, when are you going to write a book?] has finally been answered


Photo Acknowledgments

Photo of Ashley Bryan from Beat the Story-Drum, Pum-Pum by Ashley Bryan. Illustration © copyright 1980 by Ashley Bryan. Courtesy of Atheneum Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing Division.

Photo of Leo and Diane Dillon courtesy of The Blue Sky Press, Scholastic, Inc.

Photo of Tom Feelings courtesy of Dial Books for Young Readers © 1997.

Photo of Angela Johnson courtesy of Orchard Books.

Photo of Virginia Hamilton courtesy of Skylight Studios and Penguin Putnam, Inc.

Photo of Patricia C. McKissack and Fredrick L. McKissack courtesy of Scholastic, Inc.

Photo of Walter Dean Myers courtesy of Scholastic, Inc.

Photo of Jerry Pinkney courtesy of Dial Books for Young Readers © 1997.

Photo of James E. Ransome courtesy of Holiday House.

Photo of John Steptoe by James Ropiequet Schmidt. Courtesy of the John Steptoe Literary Trust, Ann White, Trustee.

Photo of Mildred D. Taylor courtesy of Dial Books for Young Readers © 1997.

Photo of Rita Williams-Garcia by Peter C. Garcia. Courtesy of Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers.

-xiii-

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