Coretta Scott King Award Books: Using Great Literature with Children and Young Adults

By Claire Gatrell Stephens | Go to book overview

Chapter 7
Her Stories: African American Folktales,
Fairy Tales, and True Tales
and The People
Could Fly: American Black Folktales
Virginia HamiltonIllustrated by Leo Dillon and Diane Dillon1996 Coretta Scott King Author Award and Illustrator Honor Award (Her Stories)1986 Coretta Scott King Author Award and Illustrator Honor Award
(The People Could Fly)
About the Books
Virginia Hamilton carefully researched these books, pulling from a variety of sources. Her introduction to each volume contains valuable insights into the folktales they contain and her versions of them. Her Stories focuses on tales about women and provides insights into what was important for women during the times when these tales took place. The People Could Fly contains some unfamiliar tales, as well as some of the more traditional folktales we have all heard, that contain only animal characters. Hamilton's retelling of the animal tales will delight modern children just as these stories entertained their grandparents in years past.Leo and Diane Dillon provide wonderful illustrations for each volume. Students will find that the pictures expand the stories and are thought-provoking in and of themselves.
Objectives
After reading Her Stories and The People Could Fly, the student should be able to:
1. Identify characteristics of folktales, legends, myths, and fables.
2. Demonstrate oral communication skills through the retelling of a folktale.

-105-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Coretta Scott King Award Books: Using Great Literature with Children and Young Adults
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 244

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.