U.S. History through Children's Literature: From the Colonial Period to World War II

By Wanda J. Miller | Go to book overview

Chapter 10
Supplemental
U.S. History
Resources

Aten, Jerry. Challenge Through American History. Carthage, IL: Good Apple, 1992.

Explore American History with students in grades 4–8 through 1,440 questions on 360 durable game cards.

Cobblestone: The History Magazine for Young People. Peterborough, NH: Cobblestone.

The focus of the January 1990 issue for grades 4 and up is [What Is History?] Articles include [We Cannot Escape History,] [History for the Future,] and [Living History.]

The January 1995 issue contains articles on the U.S. Constitution of the United States, Abraham Lincoln, and World War II.

Cohn, Amy L., compiler. From Sea to Shining Sea: A Treasury of American Folklore and Folk Songs. New York: Scholastic, 1993.

This is an anthology of more than 140 American folktales, songs, poems, and essays arranged in fifteen thematic, chronological sections. Use this book with students in grades 4 and up to trace America's history from pre-Columbian time to today.

Fischer, Max W. American History Simulations. Huntington Beach, CA: Teacher Created Materials, 1993.

Simulations, problem-solving dilemmas, and games related to important events in American history will excite your students in grades 4–8.

Garraty, John A. 1,001 Things Everyone Should Know About American History. New York: Doubleday, 1989.

This book presents short entries about people, places, ideas, politics, and events from America's past in an entertaining manner. Use with students in grades 7 and up.

Gordon, Patricia, and Reed C. Snow. Kids Learn Amer- ica! Bringing Geography to Life with People, Places and History. Charlotte, VT: Williamson, 1992.

This book provides information on geography, history, and culture of the states and territories of the United States. Can be used with students in grades 4–8.

Hopkins, Lee Bennett, collector. Hand in Hand: An American History Through Poetry. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1994.

This collection of poems and lyrics from several songs provides students in grades 3 and up with a look at our country, from colonial times to the present.

Kalman, Bobbie. Historic Communities: 18th Century Clothing. New York: Crabtree, 1993.

Kalman examines the clothing styles, accessories, and hygiene habits of men, women, and children in eighteenth-century North America. Use with students in grades 4–7.

——. Historic Communities: 19th Century Clothing. New York: Crabtree, 1993.

Kalman examines the clothes and accessories worn by nineteenth-century men, women, and children in North America. Use with students in grades 4–7.

Laughlin, Mildred Knight, Peggy Tubbs Black, and Margery Kirby Loberg. Social Studies Readers Theatre for Children. Englewood, CO: Teacher Ideas Press, 1991.

This volume includes fourteen tall-tale scripts, as well as a section using eight books by Laura Ingalls Wilder in a readers theatre program. Also included are sixty suggested scripts for students to write based on passages from books about colonial America and the Revolutionary War, the Civil War, the settling of the West, and twentieth-century America. Use with students in grades 4 and up.

Lloyd, Ruth, and Norman Lloyd, compilers. The American Heritage Songbook. New York: American Heritage, 1969.

This book contains many songs about United States history for use with students in grades 5 and up.

Panzer, Nora, ed. Celebrate America in Poetry and Art. New York: Hyperion Books for Children, 1994.

Panzer includes a collection of American poetry that celebrates more than 200 years of American life and history as illustrated by art from the collection of the National Museum of Modern Art. Use this book with students in grades 3 and up.

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