Assessment Matters in Higher Education: Choosing and Using Diverse Approaches

By Sally Brown; Angela Glasner | Go to book overview

6
The Experience of Innovative
Assessment: Student
Perspectives

Liz McDowell and Kay Sambell

There has been considerable diversification in the methods of assessing student learning in higher education in recent years. Few courses in the UK now rely solely on the conventional finals examinations supplemented by essays or, in scientific subjects, laboratory reports. The diversity of assessment practice is well illustrated by the survey carried out in Scotland by the ASSHE project (Hounsell et al. 1996). There are a growing number of texts from various parts of the world reviewing alternative assessment practices (for example Cross and Angelo 1988; Birenbaum and Dochy 1996; Brown et al. 1997). Other authors focus on specific aspects or forms of assessment, such as self-assessment and peer assessment (Boud 1995), profiles (Assiter et al. 1992) or group-based tasks (Thorley and Gregory 1994).

Examples of alternative or innovative assessment which are now recognized are described elsewhere in this volume in Chapters 1 and 8. In many cases, new forms of assessment have been introduced because of some sense of dissatisfaction with conventional assessment methods among academics and other stakeholders such as employers and professional bodies. There is a view that a broader range of assessment methods may provide a more accurate representation of students' knowledge and understanding, that alternative approaches may be more appropriate to the kinds of abilities now demanded of graduates and that this may also enhance learning and teaching (Brown and Knight 1994).

We may be moving from a testing culture into a new assessment culture as suggested by Birenbaum (1996). One of the main changes which she identifies as part of the new assessment culture, is the integration of assessment, teaching and learning, replacing the view of testing as a separate function which takes place after teaching and learning have occurred. She also perceives a shift in the role of students; they are seen as active participants in both learning and assessment rather than being the 'victims' of the assessor. A further major change is in the nature of assessment tasks which

-71-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Assessment Matters in Higher Education: Choosing and Using Diverse Approaches
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 212

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.