Assessment Matters in Higher Education: Choosing and Using Diverse Approaches

By Sally Brown; Angela Glasner | Go to book overview

16
Using Peer Assessment and
Self-Assessment for the
First Time

Paul Roach


Introduction

The case study detailed in this chapter outlines the experiences I had in my first encounter with any form of assessment other than tutor-based. Despite assurances from colleagues that the outcome of the use of a combination of peer assessment and self-assessment is generally that the students end up with lower marks than a tutor would have awarded them, my expectation was that the reverse would be true. In the case described, my fears were realized, but further consideration of this outcome revealed much to me about my own attitudes towards assessment, and revealed flaws in my implementation of the assessment exercise, arising in particular from my use of peer assessment. In this account, I describe the assessment exercise and attempt to outline the flaws in implementation. I also offer proposals for an improved means of implementing it in the future.

As part of an introductory taught module on basic information technology and communication skills, -students are to improve their skills in the presentation of information. One specific aim of the module is to give students experience of group presentations and to direct them towards good practices. The exercise is assessed to provide grades (Fail, Pass, Merit, Distinction) for certain Business and Technical Education Council (BTEC) common skills areas for the students (concerned with the presentation of information, working in teams, and oral and non-verbal communication). In the case described here, two classes were involved: 26 first-year Higher National Diploma (HND) Mathematics and Computing students, and 17 first-year HND Business Decision Analysis students.

In general, many of the students taking the module are not well motivated and make little effort in many parts of it, including the group presentations. Some means of involving them more in this important exercise was

-191-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Assessment Matters in Higher Education: Choosing and Using Diverse Approaches
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 212

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.