(Not) Keeping Up with Our Parents: The Decline of the Professional Middle Class

By Nan Mooney | Go to book overview

2
FROM THE NEW DEAL TO THE NEW ECONOMY

A Short History of the American Middle Class

“We're hemorrhaging money and I don't know how to stop the leak.”

“Dealing with finances was always like spinning plates. One unexpected thing thrown in the mix and suddenly it all goes tumbling.”

“It's like we're living on the edge of a financial cliff and the tiniest thing could push us off.”

“It always feels like I'm just this side of financial catastrophe.”

No matter how colorfully they chose to phrase it, the individuals and families I spoke to expressed a level of panic and desperation that seems new to the middle-class experience, a sense of permanently careening out of control. When we first emerge from our college cocoons, many of us are determined to try and avoid financial hardship, but quickly learn that for most of us that attempt will be fruitless.

Perhaps the most striking aspect of this fear consuming so many of us is that it isn't one thing—one tangible, tackle-able thing—but the whole erratic picture, the combination of small problems and large stressors, that has us overwhelmed. One strand of financial stress—increased cost of housing, child care, or health care, or periodic dips in income—we might be able to handle. But being hit by all these economic blows simultaneously is too much, both financially and psychologically. You can't isolate and address them the way a social scientist or researcher would. Instead, one stumble causes another and then another—the mortgage, the credit card company, the biological clock that won't wait for you to pick yourself up and dust yourself off.

-19-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
(Not) Keeping Up with Our Parents: The Decline of the Professional Middle Class
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 254

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.