Let Her Speak for Herself: Nineteenth-Century Women Writing on the Women of Genesis

By Marion Ann Taylor; Heather E. Weir | Go to book overview

§17 Henriette Greenebaum Frank
(1854–1922)

Henriette Frank was born in Chicago to Michael and Sarah Spiegel Greenebaum. She was educated in Chicago and Frankfurt, Germany. She married Henry L. Frank in 1873. Frank became a member of the Chicago Woman's Club in 1877 and served as its president in 1884–1885. She was also active in the Chicago branch of the Council of Jewish Women.44

Like Ray Frank, Henriette Frank gave a paper at the Jewish Women's Congress. The excerpt given below is from her paper, "Jewish Women of Modern Days." Frank read the story of Eve as a wisdom tale. She removed sin from the story. Her reading of the Genesis text presented women very positively.

From Henriette45 G. Frank, "Jewish Women of Modern Days," in Papers
of the Jewish Women's Congress
(Philadelphia: The Jewish Publication
Society of America, 1894), 43.

The woman of our day, like Eve, the All-Mother, stretches out her hand for the fruit of the tree of knowledge that she may know good from evil; though she lose the paradise of ignorance, she may gain the field of honest endeavor. The serpent appears to her not as Satan, the tempter, but rather as the companion of Minerva, the symbol of wisdom and of eternity.46 If Adam had eaten more freely of the fruit tendered him by Eve, his descendants might have become too wise to deny to women capabilities equal to men's. Would Adam have given Eve of the fruit, had he been the first to taste of it? Adam now permits Eve to enjoy the fruit, while he digs about the roots of the tree, until he lands at the antipodes in his effort to reach final causes.

44 Source: Obituary in Publications of the American Jewish Historical Society 29 (1925),
159–60.

45 In Papers of the Jewish Woman's Congress, Franks's name is listed as Henrietta G. Frank.
Her biographical material spells it as Henriette.

-92-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Let Her Speak for Herself: Nineteenth-Century Women Writing on the Women of Genesis
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 495

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.