Let Her Speak for Herself: Nineteenth-Century Women Writing on the Women of Genesis

By Marion Ann Taylor; Heather E. Weir | Go to book overview
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§21 Sarah Trimmer
(1741–1810)

Sarah Trimmer (née Kirby) was born in Ipswich and lived there until her family moved to London. She was educated in the Christian faith by her father and studied English and French in a small school for young women in Ipswich. The family moved to London so her father, Joshua Kirby, an artist and architect, could take up a post teaching drawing to the future George III. Kirby was later appointed clerk of the works of the palace at Kew. The only lay member of a clerical club, Joshua Kirby immersed himself in theology. He passed on his appreciation of the established Church of England and knowledge of divinity to his daughter.

1 Modern feminists also fill in gaps and rewrite Sarah's story. Though the tools modern
readers bring to the task of interpretation may be much more sophisticated and the convictions
and experiences more varied, they share much in terms of approach with their nineteenth-
century foremothers. Compare Grace Aguilar to Phyllis Trible, "Genesis 22: The Sacrifice of
Sarah," in Not in Heaven: Coherence and Complexity in Biblical Narrative, ed. Jason Rosenblatt
and Joseph Sitterson, Indiana Studies in Biblical Literature (Bloomington: Indiana University
Press, 1991), 170–91.

-109-

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