Let Her Speak for Herself: Nineteenth-Century Women Writing on the Women of Genesis

By Marion Ann Taylor; Heather E. Weir | Go to book overview
Save to active project

Conclusion

Nineteenth-century female authors loved "the beautiful and pastoral story of Rebekah." They approached this narrative looking for lessons and applications for their own lives and the lives of their readers. King's exhortation to her readers encapsulated this interpretive approach: "Let us pause an instant here, and apply this to ourselves, with the important question, Do we, in a similar case, 'do likewise?'" Most of these authors would agree with King that all readers could find points at which Rebekah's story resonated with their lives:

All females, and indeed all human beings, have a very excellent example in this
part of the history; all examples should produce in us self-examination, how
far we imitate, or depart from, the pattern before us. Are we always anxious
to shew kindness and civility to strangers? Do we even study to do so to our
friends and neighbours? Are we constantly seeking occasion to assist and ben-
efit all whom we meet with; hasting to employ the means in our power in sup-
plying their wants, and contributing to their comfort; encountering any degree
of labour we are capable of, and submitting to any inconvenience, where the
necessities of our fellow-creatures, or even a poor animal may require it? If
we have hitherto been deficient in these virtues, let us humbly beseech the
Almighty to take from us "this heart of stone, and put his holy and benevolent
Spirit within us."

Although the lessons women authors drew from Rebekah's story varied, a number of common themes emerged. First, Rebekah's virtuous qualities (modesty, industry, generosity, hospitality) made her a positive model for women called to take up their appointed domestic duties. Second, Rebekah's negative qualities (preferential parenting and deception) allowed women to address issues related to parenting and family life and forced them to wrestle with such theological questions as divine guidance and providence, and the relationship of ends and means. Their teaching and preaching of the Rebekah story revealed their high view of "the pure simple truths of Scripture." They used the Bible to authorize their applications of the story to the present, especially in their conclusions. They knew the Bible very well, and many authors felt free to cite verses out of context if they proved their point. But since the writers who did this viewed all Scripture as true, they regarded its principles as true regardless of context.

These selections also show that women used a number of different interpretive strategies in their approach to the text. Most women drew on the resources

-321-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Let Her Speak for Herself: Nineteenth-Century Women Writing on the Women of Genesis
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 495

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.