Let Her Speak for Herself: Nineteenth-Century Women Writing on the Women of Genesis

By Marion Ann Taylor; Heather E. Weir | Go to book overview

§71 M. G.
(fl. 1893)

M. G. was an Anglican woman, who was involved in mothers' meetings.29 Her book, Women Like Ourselves, consisted of lectures given in these meetings, written down so that others could use them in their own mothers' meetings. Like the de Rothschilds and O'Keeffe, M. G. compared Rachel to Rebekah, and suggested that Jacob was attracted to her because she resembled his mother. M. G. called Rachel and Jacob's youthful love the last remnant of the happiness that Adam and Eve knew in Eden. M. G., like other women writers, noted that marriage between one man and one woman was the biblical ideal. Unlike other writers, however, she drew lessons for monogamous marriage both from the relationship of Leah and Jacob, and the relationship of Rachel and Jacob. M. G. also raised the question of women's nature and role by noting that Laban treated his daughters like property, but she argued that his poor parenting did not excuse his daughters from obeying him.

From M. G. Women Like Ourselves (London: SPCK, 1893), 35–41.


–Rachel and Leah–

IN the early part of Rachel's history we have a beautiful love-story, another pure and honourable courtship, undertaken, like that of her aunt Rebekah, in the fear and under the guidance of Almighty God (see Gen. xxviii. 1–5, 20–22). Around such pure and holy love-scenes the angels delight to hover, for the Father Who made the sunshine and the flowers, the birds and the butterflies, rejoices in the happiness of His creatures, and He sends these golden hours into our lives to be a treasured possession all through the weary days to come, as well as to make present misfortunes sit lightly. The blissful days of youthful love are all that we have left now of the perfect happiness which our first parents enjoyed in the Garden of Eden. How often, still, that perfect happiness is ruthlessly destroyed by disobedience to the restrictions which God's law has placed upon it!

Rachel reminds us in many ways of her aunt Rebekah. Perhaps it was this resemblance to his mother which won the heart of Jacob, when he first saw her. Lonely and weary, he was sitting by the well in the noonday heat, when he learned that he was near to his uncle's house, and that the beautiful girl

29 For more information on M. G., see part 3, "Hagar—The Wanderer."

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