Body Image: A Handbook of Theory, Research, and Clinical Practice

By Thomas F. Cash; Thomas Pruzinsky | Go to book overview

29
Hispanic Body Images

MADELINE ALTABE
KEISHA-GAYE N. O'GARO

In this brief chapter we discuss ideas and evidence regarding Hispanic body images, a fast-growing area of research. Weight-related Hispanic body image has been studied more extensively because of its relationship to eating disorders. However, general appearance body image has been studied to some extent, as has the construct of acculturation in relation to body image. We present a working framework for understanding the issues and research that will emerge over the next decade.


THE CULTURAL CONTEXT

In the United States, the term "Hispanic" is used to refer to groups with backgrounds ranging from South America to the Caribbean. Although there may be some generalities about Hispanic culture, each national group is unique. Indeed, the term "Hispanic" is not universally accepted; many prefer the term "Latino" or "Latina" (for females). The primary comparison group for studies in the United States is referred to as white, Caucasian, European American, or Anglo. We use all these terms in this chapter, depending on the language that authors used in describing their study populations. The concepts and research presented in this chapter are largely based on U.S. literature and are intended to be helpful in understanding Hispanic American body image. Most research compares Hispanic Americans to European Americans. One could describe Hispanic body image as a construct on its own terms. For a more detailed review of body image in Latin American countries, the interested reader may want to consult the Spanish language psychological literature.

-250-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Body Image: A Handbook of Theory, Research, and Clinical Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 530

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.