Body Image: A Handbook of Theory, Research, and Clinical Practice

By Thomas F. Cash; Thomas Pruzinsky | Go to book overview

34
Body Image and Anorexia Nervosa

DAVID M. GARNER


DIAGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Body image disturbance is one of the most common clinical features attributed to anorexia nervosa. Most contemporary theories consider body dissatisfaction to be the most immediate or proximal antecedent to the development of anorexia nervosa. Empirical studies indeed confirm that a strong concern about physical appearance predates the onset of the disorder. Anorexia nervosa has also been explained in terms of a more fundamental perceptual deficit related to size estimation. This explanation has intuitive appeal because it provides an explanatory construct for the perplexing claim by many of these emaciated patients that they have a morbid fear of gaining weight because they "feel too fat." The importance of the body image construct is reflected in its inclusion in the diagnostic criteria for anorexia nervosa in the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR; American Psychiatric Association, 2000): "an intense fear of gaining weight or becoming fat, even though underweight" and "disturbance in the way in which one's body weight or shape is experienced, undue influence of body weight or shape on self-evaluation, or denial of the seriousness of current low body weight" (p. 589).

This definition reflects the consensus at the time that the body image construct is multidimensional, involving perceptual as well as attitudinal components. Even though there is widespread acceptance that body image is a key contributor to anorexia nervosa, there have been authors who have argued that it is not diagnostically distinctive or that it is a largely culturebound concept and should not be considered essential for a diagnosis. Nevertheless, there is mounting evidence that body image disturbance, opera-

-295-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Body Image: A Handbook of Theory, Research, and Clinical Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 530

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.