Biofeedback: A Practitioner's Guide

By Mark S. Schwartz; Frank Andrasik | Go to book overview

About the Editors

Mark S. Schwartz, PhD, began his professional experience with biofeedback in 1974 at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. From 1978 through 1982, he chaired the Professional Affairs Committee (PAC) of the Biofeedback Society of America (BSA). During that time, the Committee developed the original Applications Standards and Guidelines for Providers of Biofeedback Services, published in 1982. The Biofeedback Certification Institute of America (BCIA), founded in 1981, started from within the PAC. Dr. Schwartz chaired the BCIA Board for several years and then chaired the early growth of the written examination. He also served as President of the BSA from March 1987 to March 1988. He has been on the staff of Mayo Clinics since 1967, including 21 years in Rochester, Minnesota, and nearly 16 years at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida. He is a Senior Fellow of the Biofeedback Certification Institute of America.

Frank Andrasik, PhD, began his professional career in the Department of Psychology at the State University of New York in Albany. He later served as Associate Director for the Pain Therapy Centers in Greenville, South Carolina. His current affiliation is Senior Research Scientist at the Institute for Human and Machine Cognition and Professor of Psychology at the University of West Florida in Pensacola, Florida. He has also served the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (AAPB) in numerous capacities, in particular as Chair of the Task Force on Biofeedback Treatment of Tension Headache in 1984, President from 1993 to 1994, and most recently and currently as Editor-in-Chief of the Association's journal, Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback. He is also a recipient of the AAPB's Merit Award for Long-Term Research and/or Clinical Achievements, as well as the AAPB's Distinguished Scientist Award. He is a Senior Fellow of the Biofeedback Certification Institute of America.

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