Biofeedback: A Practitioner's Guide

By Mark S. Schwartz; Frank Andrasik | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 34
Fibromyalgia Syndrome

MARK S. SCHWARTZ

JEFFREY M. THOMPSON

Relaxation therapies with surface electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback are part of acceptable treatment protocols for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and related diagnoses. Patient education literature from the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), the American Fibromyalgia Syndrome Association, and journal articles support these treatments for FMS and related conditions (McCain, 1990; Thompson, 1990, 2000; see also the "Resources" section at the end of the chapter). These treatments are most effective as components of a multidisciplinary treatment program.

These patients are very commonly seen by practitioners (particularly mental health professionals) who use biofeedback for reasons in addition to muscle pain (e.g., history of emotional trauma, psychological problems, irritable bowel syndrome "IBS", anxiety disorders, migraine headaches, depression). Thus it is important to have an understanding of the multiple facets of this disorder. (As in other chapters, italics on first use of a term indicate that the term is included in the glossary at the chapter's end.)


TERMS AND DEFINITIONS

The most widely used term and the term now accepted by the ACR is "fibromyalgia syndrome" (FS or FMS; abbreviated in this chapter as FMS) (Wolfe et al., 1990). However, the disorder is often referred to only as "fibromyalgia." Specific criteria for diagnosis are found in many references, including those by Thompson (2000), Wolfe et al. (1990), and Okifugi and Turk (1999); they include widespread pain of greater than 3 months' duration and 11 of 18 "tender points." The history of the terms is discussed by Thompson (1990, 2000). There is abundant literature discussing other related diagnoses and terms, and how they are different from, overlap, and blend into FMS (Thompson, 1990, 2000; Wolfe et al., 1990).

Gradual onset of symptoms is typical among persons diagnosed with FMS. However, substantial subsets of these patients report physical or emotional traumas that immediately precede or seem to precipitate the FMS onset. The nature of the relationship is unclear. Physical traumas include motor vehicle accidents, surgery, work-related injuries, and viral illness (Aaron et al., 1997).

-776-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Biofeedback: A Practitioner's Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 930

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.