Causes of Conduct Disorder and Juvenile Delinquency

By Benjamin B. Lahey; Terrie E. Moffitt et al. | Go to book overview

Index
Abstainers from delinquency, 60–61
Abuse
growth in aggression and, 265–267
prefrontal deficits and, 288
Active genotype–environment correlations, 95
ADHD (attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder)
conduct problems and, 91–92
executive functions and, 234–235, 243
genetic influences on, 97–98
Adolescence-limited antisocial behavior
abstainers from delinquency and, 60–61
duration of problems and, 64–65
gender and, 65–67
influences on, 58–60
overview of, 49, 50–51, 292–293
prefrontal cortex and, 294
race and, 67–69
research needed on, 69–70
unconventional excitement seeking and, 61–62
See also Life-course-persistent antisocial behavior
Adoptee research designs, 13–14, 305–306, 316
Affective working memory, 290
Age
antisocial behavior and, 4–5
delinquency and, 184–185, 306–308
as moderator of genetic and environmen
tal influences on antisocial behavior, 312–313
Age–crime curve, 192–193
Agency, 123, 131
Age of onset, definition of, 78–79
Aggression
biological embedding hypothesis, 208– 209
caregiver hypothesis, 207–208
chronic physical, causes of, 195–205
chronic physical, development of, 190– 195
definition of, 190
developmental continuity and stability of individual differences, 351–352, 357– 358
developmental model of, 205–206
distal and proximal causes of, 191–192
environmental risk factors, 203–205
experiments, major and minor, 209–213
gender differences, 40–43
gene–environment interactions, 355–356, 357
group differences, 267–268
impulsive, primate analogues of, 346– 350
individual risk factors, 198–203
intentionality issue, 189–190
longitudinal studies of, 262
mental processes hypothesis, 255
nature–nurture issues, 352–355, 357
nervous system maldevelopment and, 52
peer rejection and, 263–265, 332–334
prediction of growth and change in over time, 260–263
prevention experiments, 206–207, 213– 214
primate studies of, 356–358
seriousness issue, 189
serotonin metabolite (5-HIAA) and, 346
sex-difference hypothesis, 209

-363-

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