Intellectual Disability: Understanding Its Development, Causes, Classification, Evaluation, and Treatment

By James C. Harris | Go to book overview

10
Ethics and Spirituality

This chapter considers ethical and spiritual issues related to intellectual disability. Consideration of the meaning of life of an intellectually disabled person must take into account how society defines and responds to individual differences. There are ethical and religious concerns regarding prenatal diagnosis and questions of how to teach ethical behavior to persons with intellectual disability. Participation in religious practices in the community and in group home settings is important for families and persons with intellectual disability. This chapter reviews these issues in detail.


HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE

In biblical times, there were edicts about disability that offer insight into attitudes toward disabled people. There is an Old Testament injunction: [Thou shalt not curse the deaf, put a stumbling block before the blind, nor maketh the blind wander out of a path] (Leviticus 19:14). This may be the first Western command to legislate for the protection of the deaf and handicapped. Moreover, deaf persons without speech were viewed as children and provided the same protections as children. Yet, the threat of disability was also an element in biblical injunctions: [If you do not follow his commandments and decrees … all these curses will become upon you and overtake you: The Lord will afflict you with madness, blindness, and confusion of mind. At midday, you will grope around like a man in the dark] (Deuteronomy 28:15). Although help for those with disabilities was seen as a charitable obligation, disability was perceived potentially as a punishment from God. Ancient people often believed that illness was inflicted by a deity or supernatural power (Rosen, 1968). In records dating back before 2000 B.C., the birth of children with congenital impairments were used to predict the future of the community. In Babylonia, those who pro

-333-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Intellectual Disability: Understanding Its Development, Causes, Classification, Evaluation, and Treatment
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 429

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.