Intellectual Disability: Understanding Its Development, Causes, Classification, Evaluation, and Treatment

By James C. Harris | Go to book overview

APPENDIX F
Keeping the Promises: National Goals, State of Knowledge, and Research Agenda for Persons with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

The United States has made important promises to its citizens with intellectual and developmental disabilities. We find them in the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, Supreme Court decisions, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, the Rehabilitation Act, and President Bush's New Freedom Initiative. These are expressions of national values and commitments to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Among these promises are access to needed community services, individualized supports, and other forms of assistance that promote selfdetermination, independence, productivity, and integration and inclusion in all facets of community life. [Keeping the Promises] means that people with disabilities not only can participate in the community, but that people with disabilities have a place in the community.

In January 2003, nearly 250 invited participants came together to review the nation's goals for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and the role of research in helping to achieve them. Participants were sponsored by more than 40 organizations, including nine federal agencies. Invited participants included national leaders in research, advocacy, policy, and program management. Family members and self-advocates with intellectual and developmental disabilities were well represented. Conference participants identified four general areas to improve progress toward national goals: (1) Improving Links between Current Knowledge and Public Policy; (2) Improving Relevance of Research for All Stakeholders; (3) Improving Translation of Research into Effective Common Practice; and (4) Improving Ways to Share Information with All Who Need It.

From The Arc of the United States (2003). Reprinted with permission of publisher from Keeping the Promises: National Goals, State of Knowledge, and Research Agenda for Persons with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. Copyright © 2003.

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