Developing Learning Environments: Creativity, Motivation and Collaboration in Higher Education

By Ora Kwo; Tim Moore et al. | Go to book overview
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References

Abell, S.K., D.R. Dillon, C.J. Hopkins, W.D. Mclnemey, and D.G. O'Brien. 1995. Somebody to count on: mentor/intern relationships in a beginning teacher internship program. Teaching and Teacher Education 11(2): 173–83.

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Arseneau, R. and D. Rodenburg. 1998. The developmental perspective. Cultivating ways of thinking. In Five perspectives on teaching in adult and higher education, edited by D. D Pratt. Malabar FL: Kreiger Pub. 105–49.

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Balla, J.I. 1990. Insight into some aspects of clinical education—I. Clinical practice. Postgraduate Medical Journal 66: 212–7.

Barchechath, E. 1996. What change for teachers? In Proceedings of the Conference on Lifelong Learningfor the Information Society (LILIS). Genoa, Italy, 24–28 March. Available at http://www.etnoteam.it/lilis/english/ThemeCT.html

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