Applied Exercise Psychology: A Practitioner's Guide to Improving Client Health and Fitness

By Mark H. Anshel | Go to book overview
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Chapter 7
Exercise Prescription
Strategies

Exercise prescription is [the process of designing a regimen of physical activity in a systematic and individualized manner] (ACSM, 2001, p. 230). The primary objective of exercise prescription is to facilitate positive changes in a client's personal physical activity program. Why would a MHP be concerned about this information? Should a MHP be trained to conduct fitness tests and prescriptions? Would it not be more appropriate for a fitness leader, personal trainer, or exercise physiologist to provide exercise prescriptions rather than individuals who are not trained in this area? Yes, to all of these questions. However: (a) not all so-called [specialists] are trained to prescribe exercise programs, (b) when an exercise program is prescribed, it is often without the benefit of fitness test data from which to make accurate exercise suggestions, (c) some MHPs are in a unique position to make at least fundamental, or approximate, exercise prescriptions because they have gained the trust of their client, who otherwise may not take the initiative to be tested or receive an exercise prescription from a personal trainer, and (d) it is important for MHPs to know this area so that he or she can make judgments about the appropriateness of the prescription their clients have received. Thus, this chapter will consist of reviewing fitness prescription techniques that reflect proper basic principles of improving fitness.

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