Advances in the Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Cognitive-Behavioral Perspectives

By Steven Taylor | Go to book overview
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Chapter 10
EFFECT OF COGNITIVE-
BEHAVIORAL TREATMENTS FOR
PTSD ON ANGER

Shawn P. Cahill, Sheila A. Rauch, Elizabeth A. Hembree, and Edna B. Foa


INTRODUCTION

Several studies have documented a relationship between anger and posttraumatic stress disorder in veterans (e.g., Chemtob, Hamada, Roitblat, & Muraoka, 1994; Frueh, Henning, Pellegrin, & Chobot, 1997; Kubany, Gino, Denny, & Torigoe, 1994) and civilian populations (Riggs, Dancu, Gershuny, Greenberg, & Foa, 1992). Yet the nature of this relationship is not completely understood. Increased anger following the experience of a traumatic event is one of the possible symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (APA, 1987). Therefore, it is not entirely surprising that some individuals with PTSD also obtain elevated scores on separate measures of anger. Furthermore, paper and pencil measures of negatively valenced emotions, such as anger, anxiety, and depression, are frequently correlated with one another, suggesting such measures may share a common core of negative affect (Watson & Clark, 1984). It therefore is possible that the relationship between anger and PTSD may reflect a common core of negative affect.

This study was supported in part by Grant MH42178 from the National Institute of Mental
Health awarded to Edna B. Foa.

The authors would like to thank David S. Riggs for his comments on an earlier draft of this
manuscript.

-175-

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