Heidegger's Philosophy of Science

By Trish Glazebrook | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

There are many people to thank for their support and assistance during the time I have been working on this book. Research was funded by the University of Toronto, the government of Ontario, and the German government, and further supported by the Department of Philosophy at Auckland University. I could not have done without the productive commentary, advice, and discussion on the entire manuscript that I got from Graeme Nicholson, Rebecca Comay, Will McNeill, and Dan Dahlstrom. Their close readings and prompt responses were indispensable to the development of this book. I am further indebted to Will McNeill for his enthusiastic and precise suggestions on translation. I am grateful to Father Joseph Owens for teaching me to love Aristotle. Jim Brown's support at the University of Toronto was supererogatory, and I owe Ian Hacking a great deal for his contribution to my understanding of the philosophy of science, despite his dislike of both Heidegger and this project. Jim Wetzel and Marilyn Thie read and commented helpfully on individual chapters. I wish I knew the names of those who asked questions on the chapter on experimentation at the Ontario Philosophical Association meeting at Waterloo University in 1993. Their comments were useful. Likewise my critique of Heidegger's reading of Aristotle was all the better for rigorous scrutiny at the Society for Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy in New Orleans in 1993 (on

and ) and Georgetown in 1996 (on Aristotle's analogy of being). The chapter on Heidegger and the institution benefited from exposure to the Department of Philosophy at DePaul University in Chicago and at the annual conference of The Society for Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy in Seattle in 1991. The original idea for the book was conceived in conversation with David Wood, and first tried out in the philosophy department at the University of Guelph in

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