Heidegger's Philosophy of Science

By Trish Glazebrook | Go to book overview

2
Experiment and Representation

THE PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE is concerned in large part with the logic and epistemology of scientific theory and practice. Heidegger is certainly a philosopher of science in this sense, for his analysis of the experimental method is an ongoing consideration of the epistemological assumptions underlying scientific rationality, as well as a historical account of the practice of science by Galileo and Newton in contrast to Aristotle. In the 1930s, Heidegger's analysis of the experimental method is the beginning of his critique of representational thinking, for the culminating question he poses is that of the role of mathematical representation in science. He uncovers a metaphysics of subjectivity in which the certainty of the experimental method is founded upon the self-assertion of the thinking subject. Experimentation is therefore underwritten in Heidegger's account by an epistemology seeking the clarity and distinctness of subjective representations, a Cartesian logic that secures in such representations truths from which other truths can follow.

Sir Karl Popper (1959) argues that the logic of scientific development is not one of verification, not one of establishing certainties and securing truths, but of the falsification of hypotheses. Kuhn (1970) maintains that the history of science consists in shifts between incommensurable paradigms, from, for example, Ptolemy's geocentric universe to Copernican heliocentrism. The history of science cannot be considered cumulative under Kuhn's account, since there is no logical continuity throughout such a shift. Lakatos (1970) defends the notion of progress against the Kuhnian view by arguing that rational reconstruction of paradigm shifts is possible. Feyerabend (1975) claims that "anything goes," that is, scientific progress best takes place when conflicting or incommensurable paradigms coexist in the

-65-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Heidegger's Philosophy of Science
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Abbreviations xi
  • Heidegger's Philosophy of Science xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: Metaphysics, Mathematics, and Science 14
  • 2: Experiment and Representation 65
  • 3: Science in the Institution 119
  • 4: Ancient Science 163
  • 5: Science and Technology 207
  • Bibliography 255
  • Index 267
  • Index of Greek Expressions 277
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 278

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.