The Trespass of the Sign: Deconstruction, Theology, and Philosophy

By Kevin Hart | Go to book overview

5
Questions of scope

Introduction

However much readers of Derrida may disagree, there is no dispute about one point: that Derrida takes apparently clear binary oppositions and seeks to demonstrate that they are neither oppositions nor clear. One place where arguments do arise, though, is over the question whether Derrida's concern is critical or ideological. If the former, deconstruction consists in showing that the apparent opposition between, say, identity and difference is in fact a mode of difference, not an opposition. If the latter, deconstruction also demonstrates that a philosophical tradition of affirming the priority of identity is contested, within history, by a minor tradition which affirms the priority of difference. So far my discussion of Derrida has focussed upon criticism rather than ideology, arguing that appeals to a genetic origin and to a structural centre are equally open to deconstruction. I have pointed out Derrida's reliance upon the Heideggerian-Nietzschean account of the history of philosophy as the history of nihilism; but I have not yet considered Derrida's ideological stake in the history of philosophy.

Indeed, my examination of the status of deconstruction has tended to foreclose questions that might arise concerning its scope. Différance is not merely the name of a particular concept but also the condition of possibility for conceptuality as such. Thus the scope of deconstruction is unlimited: it operates in all texts - philosophical, theological, literary or whatever - as well as in all the various positions in any given dispute. A cursory reading of Derrida confirms this view. He points with the one hand to thinkers such as Plato and Hegel who elaborate the central themes of metaphysics with exemplary power; and, with the other hand, to writers such as Husserl and Heidegger who

-138-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Trespass of the Sign: Deconstruction, Theology, and Philosophy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction to the 2000 Edition ix
  • Preface xxxiii
  • I - Confrontation 1
  • 1: Interpretation, Signs and God 3
  • 2: Deconstruction Otherwise 40
  • 3: Metaphysics and Theology 71
  • II - Examination 105
  • 4: The Status of Deconstruction 107
  • 5: Questions of Scope 138
  • III - Dialogue 171
  • 6: The Economy of Mysticism 173
  • 7: Kant: Mysticism and Parerga 207
  • 8: Heidegger 237
  • Appendix to: The 2000 Edition 271
  • The God Effect 273
  • Bibliography 299
  • Index of People 313
  • Index of Topics 317
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 320

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.