Shakespeare and the Culture of Christianity in Early Modern England

By Dennis Taylor; David Beauregard | Go to book overview

6
Mocking Oldcastle:
Notes Toward Exploring a
Possible Catholic Presence
in Shakespeare's Henriad

by Gary D. Hamilton

University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland

IN DEDICATING HIS 1565 TRANSLATION of Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England to "Elizabeth Defendour of the Faith," Thomas Stapleton counseled his Queen that monarchs, as defenders of the faith, were to seek to unite Christendom, as the worthiest of those past "Princes of every singular province in Christendom" had attempted to do after they were no longer "one empire" (Stapleton 1565, >1r). Prominent among the named actions for Elizabeth to imitate was the "extirping of the heresies of John Wicleff and the Bohems," and prominent among the actors to emulate was England's own Henry V, who postponed fulfilling his private political goals until he had acted to promote the cause of Christian unity:

In the history of Polidore we read of that Noble Prince that having
called a Parlement, and decreed therein a voyage in to Fraunce for recov-
ery of his right… yet the generall Councell of Constance then beinge
appointed, he staied his privat quarrel for Gods cause, directed his legats
unto the Councell… and in the meane while appeased the rebellion of
John Oldecastle labouring by force and disobedience against his
Souverain (as the new Wicleffs do presently in Fraunce and Scotland) to
maintaine the heresy of Wicleff, and pronounced traitours all the adher-
ents of that wicked secte. By this speedy diligence of that gratious
Prince, bothe that heresy was then quailed in your highnes dominions,
and (as Polidore noteth) the Noble victories of that valiaunt prince

-141-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Shakespeare and the Culture of Christianity in Early Modern England
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 452

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.