New Thoughts on the Black Arts Movement

By Lisa Gail Collins; Margo Natalie Crawford | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Collaboration and dialogue were at the heart of the Black Arts Movement. This collection continues this necessary work. As co-editors, we came together from our respective departmental homes in English and art history to the essential interdisciplinary field of African American studies to hone and share our mutual interest in the arts and politics of the 1960s and 1970s. The response to our call for others immersed in this crucial period was extraordinary; we were inundated with fresh research. In the end, we selected essays that creatively addressed several new avenues of inquiry. What were the principal cities and sites of the movement? How were art forms fused and synthesized, and why were criteria for creating and evaluating art so hotly contested during the period? And what are the links between the Black Arts Movement and other sociocultural movements? Who are the movement's predecessors and peers, and what are its legacies?

Support for this dialogue and collaboration was indispensable. Leslie Mitchner, editor in chief at Rutgers University Press, offered crucial early support, encouragement, and guidance. Simply put, Leslie Mitchner and her colleagues at the press made this book possible. Our contributors inspired us with their originality and accessibility. We are honored to be in conversation with them, and we thank all of them for generously sharing their brand new work with us. Two of our intellectual role models, Houston A. Baker, Jr., Susan Fox Beischer and George D. Beischer Arts and Sciences Professor of English at Duke University, and Haki Madhubuti, Distinguished University Professor of English at Chicago State University and founder of Third World Press, graciously offered their supreme wisdom and valuable time. Bob Crawford, another vital role model, gallantly lent his visionary photography that so eloquently engages the movement and serves as the backbone of this book. The

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
New Thoughts on the Black Arts Movement
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 390

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.