Rethinking Global Security: Media, Popular Culture, and the "War on Terror"

By Andrew Martin; Patrice Petro | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Despite the timeliness of its subject matter, this volume was several years in the making. The original impetus for the essays gathered here was an international conference organized by faculty and staff at the Center for International Education at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee in the spring of 2003. This conference, entitled “Rethinking Global Security,” aimed to expand security studies beyond its traditional emphases on the international system and the nation-state and its military capacities. Interdisciplinary in scope and by design, the conference addressed such issues as global health, the environment, human rights, and peace-building efforts, as well as media, popular culture, and technology. We would like to thank Bob Beck, Terry Miller, Rob Ricigliano, and Kris Ruggiero, our co-organizers of this conference, for helping us bring together such an impressive array of speakers on such a range of issues. We wish we could have included every presentation in this volume.

But in shaping this collection for publication, we chose to emphasize the aspects of security that have been shaped by media and popular culture in the current war on terror. In this regard, we want to express our gratitude to James Castonguay and Tony Grajeda for helping us secure the participation of several scholars who did not attend the conference but whose work we believe is so crucial to “rethinking global security” that it belongs in this collection.

We would like to express our deep appreciation of the College of Letters and Science at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee, and especially of Dean Richard Meadows. His ongoing support of the Center for International Education and our efforts to broaden international, interdisciplinary, and intellectual linkages on campus have made this volume possible. We offer our heartfelt thanks to Amy Kuether, who has worked tirelessly on this and other volumes in this series, New Directions in International Studies. We

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