Rethinking Global Security: Media, Popular Culture, and the "War on Terror"

By Andrew Martin; Patrice Petro | Go to book overview

NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS

MIKE ALLEN is a professor and chair of the department of communication at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee. His research and teaching interests examine the various means of social influence processes. He has published numerous articles in such journals as Communication Monographs, Communication Theory, Law and Human Behavior, Journal of Homosexuality, and Psychological Bulletin.

MARCUS BULLOCK is a professor of English at the University of Wisconsin– Milwaukee. He is coeditor of Walter Benjamin: Selected Writings, Volume 1,1913– 1926 (1997) and author of The Violent Eye: Ernst Junger's Visions and Revisions on the European Right (1992) and Romanticism and Marxism: The Philosophical Development of Literary Theory and Literary History in Friedrich Schlegel and Walter Benjamin (1987). His teaching areas include eighteenth- to twentieth-century European literature and the Frankfurt School.

JAMES CASTONGUAY is an associate professor and chair of media studies and digital culture at Sacred Heart University in Fairfield, Connecticut. He is the former information technology officer for the Society for Cinema and Media Studies and has published on war and the media in American Quarterly, Bad Subjects, Cinema Journal, Discourse, and the Velvet Light Trap. He is currently completing a manuscript on war and global media culture from the Spanish-American War to the war on terror.

DOUG DAVIS is an assistant professor of English at Gordon College in Georgia. He received his PhD in literary and cultural studies from Carnegie Mellon University in 2003. He is currently completing his book manuscript, “Strategic Fictions: Tales of Mass Destruction in the Cold War and the War on Terror.”

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