Great World Writers: Twentieth Century - Vol. 4

By Patrick M. O'Neil | Go to book overview


William Golding

BORN: September 19, 1911, St. Columb Minor, Cornwall, England

DIED: June 19, 1993, Wiltshire, England

IDENTIFICATION: Internationally acclaimed British novelist and essayist who won the Nobel Prize for literature in 1983.

SIGNIFICANCE: Written in the aftermath of the destruction and brutality of World War II, William Golding's works often revolve around the tension between reason and barbarism that exists within all humans, the ability of even [civilized] people, when placed in stressful situations, to engage in acts of great inhumanity. His novels also explore broader thematic questions of spirituality and culture, and Goldmg utilized a variety of images from literature, mythology, and religion to create allegorical structures within his fiction to illustrate his chosen themes. Indeed, Golding is considered one of the masters of allegorical fiction. His highly esteemed 1954 novel, Lord of the Flies, has taken a place among the more important works of fiction of the twentieth century.

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Great World Writers: Twentieth Century - Vol. 4
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • William Golding 437
  • Nadine Gordimer 457
  • Robert Graves 477
  • Graham Greene 495
  • Nicoás Guillén 517
  • Imil Habibi 527
  • Václav Havel 537
  • Seamus Heaney 559
  • Index 575
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